MOVIE REVIEW: The Banker


IMDB: In the 1960s two African-American entrepreneurs hire a working-class white man to pretend to be the head of their business empire while they pose as a janitor and chauffeur.

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Based on true story, these 2 black men decided to fight the racial ceiling the society around them built.

Growing up, Garrett was taught not to dream big and that there are limitations to what they can achieve and what black men deserves – a life of servitude. Refusing to believe that his life is limited to what has been told to him, he educated himself. He listened to how white men runs their business, listened to conversations, eavesdrop on businessmen & observed how successful people thinks and acts.

Let’s give it to Garrett huh! He dreams the impossible and is firm on his principles. I also admire his tenacity to break the racial ceiling and for not giving up even when there were a lot of closed doors on the way. Remember what Steve Jobs said? People who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world, are the ones who do. If you’ve watched the film, the first building owner laughed at his idea, bankers and even Joe at first thought that his idea ridiculous. But it was his strong desire and firm belief that made it all happen.

Both Bernard and Joe fought against  this prejudice that only white men can be successful, only white men can own a building, only white men can live on posh neighborhoods, only white men can book an appointment, only white men can be granted a loan and the likes.

With this notion in mind, they hire a white man, Matt to be the face of their business so they can get their foot in the door in what once was an area they cannot enter. The relationship was going great. Matt learns a lot about the business while Bernard and Joe gathers wealth with the help of Matt. Although, relationship turns sour in the end when they were caught.

I do understand the ambition of Matt to become a business owner himself, I do. Everyone wants that. However, I also do think that he’s not ripe enough to run the business on his own which proved to be true when he failed to review the contracts.

It’s sick. right? How awfully poisoned the society was before with regards to color discrimination. It’s infuriating to be called dumb just because of the color of your skin. Remember Matt’s comment when he was being investigated? (I’m sure the janitor will not understand). Sickening, I know.

Apart from that, the film also shone the light on business and wealth building. We all learned this in class. Capital is king and it was repeated all through out the movie, and is actually one of the first things that Bernard discussed with Joe (having the capital). Additionally, it’s also admirable that Bernard and Joe is not only fighting the racism for their own good but they also want to uplift the whole black community by giving them loans as an opportunity for them to better their lives and achieve what they call the American Dream.

It’s sad that they are seen as con-artists or law breakers when they in fact are not doing anything illegal. They just made it appear that Matt, the white man is the head of the business and is running on his own while the two black men, the real brains of the business were forced to hide behind mops and wheels.

It’s a good movie to watch! Recommend me some? ❤

BOOK REVIEW : IT’S NOT LIKE IT’S A SECRET by MISA SUGIURA


It’s my second book for the year and it awakened my high school and college memories.

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Goodreads: Sixteen-year-old Sana Kiyohara has too many secrets. Some are small, like how it bothers her when her friends don’t invite her to parties. Some are big, like that fact that her father may be having an affair. And then there’s the one that she can barely even admit to herself—the one about how she might have a crush on her best friend.

When Sana and her family move to California she begins to wonder if it’s finally time for some honesty, especially after she meets Jamie Ramirez. Jamie is beautiful and smart and unlike anyone Sana’s ever known. There are just a few problems: Sana’s new friends don’t trust Jamie’s crowd; Jamie’s friends clearly don’t want her around anyway; and a sweet guy named Caleb seems to have more-than-friendly feelings for her. Meanwhile, her dad’s affair is becoming too obvious to ignore anymore.

Sana always figured that the hardest thing would be to tell people that she wants to date a girl, but as she quickly learns, telling the truth is easy… what comes after it, though, is a whole lot more complicated.

Some of my favorite lines from the movie:

  • With a face like your favorite love song and a body like fireworks on the fourth of july
  • People think they’re unique, but they’re really stereotypes. It’s just the way they are. They want to be in a group and they’ll sacrifice their individuality to fit in.
  • From Sana’s mom: I can want all kinds of things for you, but I only know that you can do your best. I am teaching you to see the world the way it is, not the way you want it to be. That’s my job.
  • Everyone – even an ugly oyster – has the power and beauty inside. But sometimes they keep it a secret. and sometimes it takes patience to find it.
  • If you’re nobody together with someone, doesn’t that make you a somebody? At least to each other? that can’t be bad right?
  • While I stand there with my heart bang-bang-booming like a bass drum.
  • Feeling like I’m going to levitate and float away in a pink cotton candy cloud.
  • Find your stride. Find a good pace and stick with it.
  • Anything for you, doll.
  • Because the reality is that life can be hard, and awful and sometimes all you can do is keep working at it. But there’s hope. There’s a future together.
  • GAMAN – it’s about stepping up and choosing which hardship you endure. And enduring it with grace because of something important, like honor or family or something important.
  • My heart is her home. ❤

One,  I can never understand how sana’s mom can endure that pain everyday. If you are looking for a light read that also tackles racism, judgement and stereotyping and love from all sorts of gender.